Weight gain during pregnancy increases risk of death after 50 years


Excessive weight gain during pregnancy has been associated with increased mortality. Depending on baseline body mass index, the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, all causes, and complications of diabetes increased.

Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) studied the relationship between excess and insufficient weight gain during pregnancy and mortality. The results of the study were published in The Lancet.

Among participants who were underweight before pregnancy (body mass index (BMI) less than 18.5 kg/m2), weight gain above the recommended level was correlated with increased cardiovascular mortality. There was no association with all-cause mortality or diabetes-related mortality.

Among women who had normal body weight before pregnancy (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), weight gain above the recommended level was associated with increased all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality, but not with mortality from diabetes complications.

Among women who were overweight before pregnancy (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m2), greater than recommended weight gain was associated with increased all-cause mortality and diabetes-related mortality, but not cardiovascular mortality. In the subgroup of women with obesity before pregnancy (BMI from 30.0 kg/m2 and above) it was not possible to identify clear relationships.

Weight gain below the recommended value was associated with a reduction in diabetes-related mortality, but only in the subpopulation of women with normal pre-pregnancy weight.




The study included 46,042 women. After 52 years of follow-up, 17,901 participants (38.9%) had died.

Scientists point out the importance of weight gain within recommended limits during pregnancy, since otherwise the consequences of excess weight gain can affect health and manifest themselves in the long term in the form of an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease, complications of diabetes and from all causes.



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