Fertility treatments increased the risk of hospitalization for stroke after childbirth


The likelihood of hospitalization for nonfatal stroke was increased in the year after birth in women receiving fertility treatment. The risk appeared to be elevated as early as one month after birth and increased over time, especially for hemorrhagic stroke.

Scientists from the Medical School. Robert Wood Johnson assessed the effect of fertility treatment on the likelihood of hospitalization for stroke after childbirth. The study results were published in the journal JAMA Network Open.

The rate of hospitalization for stroke in the year after childbirth was 37 per 100,000 in women who received fertility treatment and 29 per 100,000 in participants who gave birth after spontaneous conception. The risk of hospitalization for stroke was 66% higher among women who received fertility treatment. The likelihood of hospitalization due to hemorrhagic stroke was two times higher, and for ischemic stroke – 55%. The risk was found to be elevated as early as one month after birth and increased over time postpartum, particularly for hemorrhagic stroke.




Data from 31 million women aged 15 to 54 who gave birth from 2010 to 2018 were analyzed. 287.8 thousand study participants received infertility treatment. The authors noted that the frequency of infertility treatments increased with women’s age. The incidence of hospitalization for nonfatal stroke in the year after birth was assessed.

The authors believe that women who have received treatment for infertility need long-term follow-up after childbirth to reduce the risk of stroke.



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