Delaying surgical treatment by one day did not increase the risk of appendix perforation


Prescribing surgical treatment within 24 hours after diagnosis does not increase the risk of appendix perforation. The results obtained will allow the redistribution of operating resources, making it possible to transfer night operations to daytime, which will increase the level of safety for patients.

Scientists from the universities of Helsinki and Oslo compared the risk of appendiceal perforation in patients who received surgical treatment for appendicitis within the first eight hours after diagnosis with those who underwent surgery within the first 24 hours. The results of the study were published in The Lancet.

Experts found that scheduling surgery within 24 hours of diagnosing appendicitis did not increase the risk of perforation compared with surgery performed sooner. The perforation rate was 8% in the early group and 9% in the delayed group. The incidence of complications within 30 days after treatment was also similar in both groups and amounted to 7 and 6%, respectively. The authors emphasized that during this period there were no deaths in either group.




Data from 1803 adults with appendicitis were analyzed. Half of the participants underwent surgery within the first eight hours after diagnosis, the rest – within the first 24 hours.

For acute appendicitis, it has long been believed that surgery should be performed as soon as possible to prevent perforation, but there is now good evidence to support the safety of performing surgery within 24 hours of diagnosis, the authors noted. These results may have an impact on the allocation of operating room resources, allowing night operations to be shifted to daytime hours, which will improve patient safety.



Source link