A prognostic factor for decompensation of chronic liver failure has been identified


The factor VIII to protein C ratio reflects the risk of liver decompensation and death in patients with advanced chronic liver failure. However, changing the ratio did not affect the likelihood of bleeding or thrombosis.

The ratio of factor VIII to protein C can be used to assess the prognosis of patients with advanced chronic liver failure, a study by scientists from the University of Vienna has shown. The results were published in the Journal of Hepatology.

The analysis showed that the ratio increased significantly with increasing severity of chronic liver failure, along with increasing hepatic venous pressure gradient, and was independently associated with liver decompensation and liver disease-related death.

The ratio of factor VIII and protein C made it possible to identify patients at risk of developing acute decompensation of liver failure against the background of decompensated cirrhosis. In addition, the ratio of indicators is associated with pH value, systemic inflammation and fibrogenesis in the liver.

However, it did not reflect the level of hemostasis and did not depend on the likelihood of bleeding or thrombosis.

The study involved 576 patients with signs of progressive chronic liver failure (liver elasticity index of 10 kPa or higher and/or hepatic venous pressure gradient of 6 mm Hg or more). Before the study, 276 patients (48%) were compensated, and 300 (52%) had decompensated liver function. Acute decompensated liver failure was diagnosed in 15 participants (3%) before the start of the study.



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