Risk factors for decreased bone mineral density in type 1 diabetes mellitus have been identified


A high level of glycated hemoglobin, increased skin fluorescence and kidney damage are independent risk factors for a decrease in the mineral density of the bones that form the hip joint. The influence of diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy was not detected.

Poor glycemic control, accumulation of advanced glycation end products and diabetic kidney damage are independent risk factors for decreased hip bone mineral density in patients with type 1 diabetes, a study by a team of scientists from the University of California, George Washington University and Columbia University in New York found. The results were published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

The analysis showed that an increase in the level of glycated hemoglobin by 1% is associated with a decrease in the mineral density of bones, which are part of the hip joint, by 10 mg/cm2. An increase in skin intrinsic fluorescence, which reflects the accumulation of advanced glycation end products, by five units reduced hip bone mineral density by 20.5 mg/cm2. And the presence of diabetic kidney damage was associated with a decrease in bone mineral density by 51.7 mg/cm2.

Similar indicators were obtained when measuring the mineral density of the femoral neck and ultradistal radius. However, diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy did not affect bone density.

Researchers analyzed the influence of diabetes-related factors on decreased bone mineral density among 1,058 adults with type 1 diabetes who previously participated in the DCCT Diabetes Control and Complications Study. The average age of the participants was 59.2 years. Bone mineral density was determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.



Source link