Diabetes and heart disease increased the risk of developing dementia


The presence of several cardiovascular and metabolic diseases had a stronger influence on the risk of developing dementia than genetic factors. Improving the patient’s cardiac and metabolic profile may reduce this likelihood.

Having two or more cardiovascular or metabolic diseases is independently associated with the risk of dementia and has a greater impact than genetic risk, scientists at the University of Oxford have found. Addressing cardiovascular and metabolic multimorbidity may reduce the risk of dementia, researchers say.

Data from 203,038 people from the UK Biobank and brain MRI scans from 12,236 patients were examined. For each participant, a cardiometabolic multimorbidity index was calculated, including stroke, diabetes, and myocardial infarction (one score for each), as well as a polygenic dementia risk score (with low, intermediate, and high risk groups). Main outcome measures were incidence of all-cause dementia and structural brain measures.

The risk of dementia associated with high cardiometabolic multimorbidity was three times higher than that associated with high genetic risk.

Patients with a high genetic risk and a calculated index score of 2 or more had an increased risk of developing dementia (HR = 5.74) compared with participants with a low genetic risk and no cardiometabolic disorders.

The presence of two or more cardiovascular or metabolic diseases is independently associated with more widespread, widespread structural changes in the brain, including decreased hippocampal volume.

Individual cardiovascular, metabolic disorders and genetic factors are known to be associated with an increased risk of developing dementia, the researchers said. But the relationship between dementia and cardiometabolic multimorbidity is not fully understood.



Source link